Session Category Archives: History of Glacier

“The Glacier Park Reader” with David Stanley

DaveStanleyDavid Stanley is a former trail-crew worker in Glacier National Park, where he spent six summers during the 1960s. In those years, he worked at St. Mary, Red Eagle, Gunsight, Many Glacier, West Glacier, and the North Fork. He’s been returning to the park ever since. Before he retired from teaching, he was an English professor at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, where he specialized in American literature and folklore and also chaired the college’s Environmental Studies Program. There he taught many classes on environmental literature and writing, focusing on works pertaining to the natural world, wilderness, the preservation movement, and the national parks. He also initiated the National Park Readers series being published by the University of Utah Press, which includes the newly released Glacier Park Reader, which he edited. David is now retired from teaching and spends his time hiking, camping, and traveling with his wife Nan, as well as continuing with research, writing, and editing. He and Nan live in Salt Lake City.

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Landscapes for the People

Ren and Helen Davis are authors of the new book, Landscapes for the People: George Alexander Grant, First Chief Photographer of the National Park Service. This book provides a biography of Grant and features more than 170 of the iconic black and white images made during his 25+ year career with the National Park Service. Among these are 17 photographs from Glacier National Park. The Davis’ will present a narrated power point featuring a brief biography of Grant and his work with the park service, followed by a selection of images from the Park Service collection – including several from his many trips to Glacier. At the conclusion of the presentation they will be delighted to answer questions. A book signing and reception will follow.

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A Trip Through Glacier Park

Chris_Peterson_BookIn 1915, author Mary Roberts Rinehart wrote “Through Glacier Park in 1915″. It was  her story of a 300-mile journey through Glacier Park.  For the 100th anniversary of  that trip, Chris Peterson retraced that journey and wrote his third book “A Trip Through Glacier Park” which he will present for our first Look Listen and Learn program of the 2016 summer season.

 

Chris Peterson has been with the Hungry Horse News for the past 18 years, either as its photographer or editor or both. He lives in Columbia Falls and has hiked almost every trail in the Park and hundreds of miles in the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Reservations required – call (406) 888-5393 or click the button to send us an email. Reception to follow presentation.

 

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Stories from the Top – Glacier’s Fire Lookouts

Join Glacier Institute Director of Education Justin Barth for a journey though time chronicling the development and transformation of the fire lookout system throughout the United States and Glacier National Park.  Learn about the colorful cast of characters who have staffed Glacier’s lookouts and listen to the stories that they have brought back down to the valley floor.

There is a suggested donation of $5 per person to The Glacier Institute for this event and it is open to the public, as space is limited, reservations are required. To reserve your seats, please phone 406.888.5393 or e-mail:1960mthouse@qwestoffice.net

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Kassandra Hardy – Plans for the Centennial

Kassandra Hardy, Centennial Coordinator, Glacier National Park, discussed various plans, programs and events underway for Glacier Park’s centennial in 2010. Prior to becoming Glacier’s Centennial Coordinator, Kass worked several seasons as a Park Naturalist in both West Glacier and St. Mary. She has worked as an Environmental Planner for the NPS in Washington, DC and spent time in Yosemite National Park as a planner for the Tuolumne River Plan and for the Operational Fire Management Plan.  She has also worked as a Backcountry Ranger in Canyonlands National Park.

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